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West Coast 200
The Route

Ballachulish

No.11 on the route

The unusual name of Ballachulish comes from the Scottish Gaelic name of Baile a' Chaolais which translates as the Village by the Narrows referring to the name of the narrows at the mouth of Loch Leven. Ballachulish is actually split into two areas a north settlement and a twin settlement on the south side of the Loch Leven. There is a bridge that connects the two halves; however, in the past, the two sides of the town were connected by a ferry crossing the slipway.

There are things to do and see on both sides of Ballachulish. For example, in North Ballachulish, there is an art gallery and a couple of hotels. There is a pretty church in the north side of the town.

In south Ballachulish, you can find a memorial to James Stewart who was hanged in Ballachulish in 1752 because of the Appin Murder. This is a famous story in Scotland’s legal history as the greatest miscarriage of justice.

Ballachulish has certainly got something for everyone from slate quarries to churches to modern buildings too. Even Queen Victoria remarked her favour for Ballachulish, in her diary she discussed the slate quarrying in the area and how the pretty the village was decorated for her arrival.